STORAGE & MAGAZINES

A Storage Magazine should be a major part of any person holding any amount of Propellant, be it purchased or fabricated. This outline covers the basics for two types of magazines (Type 3 and Type 4) most applicable to person in High Power and Experimental Rocketry.To find out more about AFT legal Magazines, click HERE.

Types of magazines. For purposes of this part, there are five types of magazines. These types, together with the classes of explosive materials, as defined in ATF§ 55.202, which will be stored in them, are as follows:

 

(a) Type 1 magazines. Permanent magazines for the storage of high explosives, subject to the limitations prescribed by ATF§§ 55.206 and 55.213. Other classes of explosive materials may also be stored in type 1 magazines.

(b) Type 2 magazines. Mobile and portable indoor and outdoor magazines for the storage of high explosives, subject to the limitations prescribed by ATF§§ 55.206, 55.208( b), and 55.213. Other classes of explosive materials may also be stored in type 2 magazines.

(c) Type 3 magazines. Portable outdoor magazines for the temporary storage of high explosives while attended (for example, a "day-box"), subject to the limitations prescribed by ATF§§ 55.206 and 55.213. Other classes of explosives materials may also be stored in type 3 magazines.

(d) Type 4 magazines. Magazines for the storage of low explosives, subject to the limitations prescribed by ATF§§ 55.206( b), 55.210( b), and 55.213. Blasting agents may be stored in type 4 magazines, subject to the limitations prescribed by ATF§§ 55.206( c), 55.211( b), and 55.213. Detonators that will not mass detonate may also be stored in type 4 magazines, subject to the limitations prescribed by ATF§§ 55.206( a), 55.210( b), and 55.213.

(e) Type 5 magazines. Magazines for the storage of blasting agents, subject to the limitations prescribed by ATF§§ 55.206( c), 55.211( b), and 55.213.

Inspection of magazines. Any person storing explosive materials shall inspect his magazines at least every seven days. This inspection need not be an inventory, but must be sufficient to determine whether there has been unauthorized entry or attempted entry into the magazines, or unauthorized removal of the contents of the magazines.

Type 3 magazines. A type 3 magazine is a "day-box" or other portable magazine. It must be fire-resistant, weather-resistant, and theft-resistant. A type 3 magazine is to be constructed of not less than number 12-gauge (. 1046 inches) steel, lined with at least either 1/ 2-inch plywood or 1/ 2-inch Masonite-type hardboard. Doors must overlap sides by at least one inch. Hinges and hasps are to be attached by welding, riveting or bolting (nuts on inside). One steel padlock (which need not be protected by a steel hood) having at least five tumblers and a case-hardened shackle of at least 3/ 8-inch diameter is sufficient for locking purposes. Explosive materials are not to be left unattended in type 3 magazines and must be removed to type 1 or 2 magazines for unattended storage.

Type 4 magazines. A type 4 magazine is a building, igloo or "Army-type structure", tunnel, dugout, box, trailer, or a semitrailer or other mobile magazine.

(a) Outdoor magazines

 

(1) General. Outdoor magazines are to be fire-resistant, weather-resistant, and theft-resistant. The ground around outdoor magazines must slope away for drainage or other adequate drainage be provided. When unattended, vehicular magazines must have wheels removed or otherwise be effectively immobilized by kingpin locking devices or other methods approved by the Director.

(2) Construction. Outdoor magazines are to be constructed of masonry, metal-covered wood, fabricated metal, or a combination of these materials. Foundations are to be constructed of brick, concrete, cement block, stone, or metal or wood posts. If piers or posts are used, in lieu of a continuous foundation, the space under the building is to be enclosed with fire-resistant material. The walls and floors are to be constructed of, or covered with, a nonsparking material or lattice work. The doors must be metal or solid wood covered with metal.

(3) Hinges and hasps. Hinges and hasps are to be attached to doors by welding, riveting, or bolting (nuts on inside of door). Hinges and hasps must be installed so that they cannot be removed when the doors are closed and locked.

(4) Locks. Each door is to be equipped with

  (i) two mortise locks;
(ii) two padlocks fastened in separate hasps and staples;
(iii) a combination of a mortise lock and a padlock;
(iv) a mortise lock that requires two keys to open; or
(v) a three-point lock.
Padlocks must have at least five tumblers and case-hardened shackle of at least 3/ 8 inch diameter. Padlocks must be protected with not less than 1/ 4 inch steel hoods constructed so as to prevent sawing or lever action on the locks, hasps, and staples.
These requirements do not apply to magazine doors that are adequately secured on the inside by means of a bolt, lock, or bar that cannot be actuated from the outside.
((b) Indoor magazine
 

(1) General. Indoor magazines are to be fire-resistant and theft-resistant. They need not be weather-resistant if the buildings in which they are stored provide protection from the weather. No indoor magazine is to be located in a residence or dwelling. The indoor storage of low explosives must not exceed a quantity of 50 pounds. More than one indoor magazine may be located in the same building if the total quantity of explosive materials stored does not exceed 50 pounds. Detonators that will not mass detonate must be stored in a separate magazine and the total number of electric detonators must not exceed 5,000.

(2) Construction. Indoor magazines are to be constructed of masonry, metal-covered wood, fabricated metal, or a combination of these materials. The walls and floors are to be constructed of, or covered with, a nonsparking material. The doors must be metal or solid wood covered with metal.

(3) Hinges and hasps. Hinges and hasps are to be attached to doors by welding, riveting, or bolting (nuts on inside of door). Hinges and hasps must be installed so that they cannot be removed when the doors are closed and locked.

(4) Locks. Each door is to be equipped with

  (i) two mortise locks;
(ii)
two padlocks fastened in separate hasps and staples;
(iii) a combination of a mortise lock and padlock;
(iv) a mortise lock that requires two keys to open; or
(v) a three-point lock. Padlocks must have at least five tumblers and a
case-hardened shackle of at least 3/ 8 inch diameter.

Padlocks must be protected with not less than 1/ 4 inch steel hoods constructed so as to prevent sawing or lever action on the locks, hasps, and staples. Indoor magazines located in secure rooms that are locked as provided in this subparagraph may have each door locked with one steel padlock (which need not be protected by a steel hood) having at least five tumblers and a case-hardened shackle of at least 3/ 8 inch diameter, if the door hinges and lock hasp are securely fastened to the magazine. These requirements do not apply to magazine doors that are adequately secured on the inside by means of a bolt, lock, or bar that cannot be actuated from the outside.

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